From Organic Bed Threads perspective, producing bedlinen to certified organic standards is not only an obvious manufacturing process but an absolute necessity for preserving and protecting the environment, the many workers who make our bedlinen, and for the end user.


Our aim is to reduce the chemical overload in textile manufacturing so that people and planet are not covered on nasty chemicals that can adversely affect ones health nor cause massive devastation to the land.

Just because a product is not literally dripping in chemicals from the rack in-store, does not mean they are not there, dried into every fibre. Our aim is to educate you about our processes for peace of mind. Neither health, nor working conditions, nor comfort nor décor should raise the risk of serious health concerns such as breathing difficulties, skin allergies, deformities and cancers. We didn’t want to create products that exploited people nor the environment.

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That is why Organic Bed Threads exists. We wanted to create a brand of bedding that addressed all of the issues plaguing the textile industry today

Producing to certified organic standards is all about doing the right thing even when no one is watching or even cares. We value being beholden to production integrity. It’s what sets us apart from the plethora of fast fashion brands out there that have zero integrity.

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It’s estimated that cotton accounts for nearly a quarter of the world’s pesticide use. Certified organic cotton bans the use of synthetic pesticides and encourages crops to form a greater balance with the nature around them. Prohibiting pesticides also eliminates the risk of those substances finding their way into the water supply of the local population. Certified organic cotton is easily traceable due to transparent supply chains via the assistance of auditing bodies’ such as the Global Organic Textile Standard, as chosen by us.

Many of our social media posts may impart a somewhat direct, hard hitting approach to our messages, as opposed to the soft floaty images one sees. However, Australian consumers are somewhat behind the eight ball when it comes to buying ethically made textile products. Not so for food products, which is rather odd, as textile farming practise are an even larger extension of farming for food. It is not our intention to preach, rather to impart the necessary ‘stories behind the label’ so that you are fully informed. We have written countless messages and blogs and articles about the benefits of certified organic cotton but this message hones into the often untold, taboo, reasons why it’s important.

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As a small-fry company we have certainly pushed ourselves to the enth degree, welcoming ethical audits, producing to fair trade standards, implemented by the International Labour Organisation. Our biggest question to the rest of the manufactures out there, if we are small, and we can achieve the best for the workers and the environment, why can’t the larger brands as they would have greater positive clout.

Producing to certified organic standards is also not just about the end consumer. Our workers in India are the backbone of who we are. Like you, our workers too wish to lead full, prosperous and health lives. The images and news reports of traditional cotton farmers being coated in chemicals while they spray their crop has wider, hazardous consequences that many of us do not take into account. We already knew about the severe ill health caused to Indian farmers and their communities from spraying pesticides and fertilizers on cotton. It was a leading reason why Organic Bed Threads decided to produce with certified organic cotton.

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This is not just some sad story happening ‘over there’. All manufacturers, be that ethical or not, are interconnected with the factory workers and farmers producing the textiles we buy, as the threads on a loom criss-crossing each other. As consumers, it is our responsibility to buy from the heart and buy quality over quantity, slow fashion over fast fashion, fair trade over slave labour. Our buying power ultimately dictates how standards are set. Are you ready to make the 100% ethical choice in your next brand of bedlinen?

Organic Bed Threads is certified organic, fairly traded, artisan handmade and chemical free all the way from the farm to your linen closet. Browse their beautiful artisan duvet covers for all family members.

Tarsha Burn

Tarsha Burn

Tarsha is one of those unstoppable, passionate creators fuelled by creative obession and driven by humanitarian intent. She’s a textile designer who has worked and trained in Australia, Turkey, Italy and India. A dream held for 20 years Over 20 years ago, she started designing and creating soft furnishings for the home décor market but had a dream for her own label, which she shelved for a long time. In those earlier days, she was unaware of 'slow fashion', 'artisanal design' or 'ethical sourcing'.A humanitarian business After extensive travel and many career twists, the longing to create a humanitarian business would not leave Tarsha alone. Finally the voices in her head grew louder than her resistance. And prompted her to take a giant leap.A big passion So she spent a long hard two years in research, design and development, sold her house and travelled to India in the hope of finding her creative nirvana. It was quite a slog to give form to her passion and create what she knew was possible –eye-catching organic bed linen with greater meaning. Tarsha found that over and again that what’s called ‘ethical’ and ‘organic’ is often not the case. To encourage her manufacturer to become accredited with Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) was a rigorous process. Meaningful change in the world But when you have the resilience and tenacity that Tarsha has –- you don’t give up easily. As a socially motivated designer, she’s determined to create quality, handmade organic bed linen products that developing world producers benefit from and customers fall in love with. Her aim is one to being part of meaningful, positive change in the world.
Tarsha Burn

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